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155 Fifth Avenue Pelham, NY 10803   914.738.2525  |  Directions

FREE PUBLIC PROGRAMS




Saturday May 5, 2018

FOLK ARTS SERIES: HAWAIIAN HULA DANCING
Saturday May 5, 2018
1:30 - 3:30 PM

Folk Arts Series: Hawaiian Hula Dancing
Music Performance and a Hands-on Workshop
Free and Open to All Ages!
Saturday, May 5, 2018, 1:30 – 3:30 pm

Aloha! Hula dancers will take you to the Hawaiian Islands through song dance and audience participation. Basic hula dance moves, a Hawaiian song and some Hawaiian words will be taught. After the dance there will be a workshop on making colorful lei.

Aloha Hula NYC performers have been sharing Hawaiian and Polynesian culture for over 20 years across the US and abroad including Australia, the Philippines and Bahrain in the Middle East. The company regularly shares “Aloha” it the tri-state area. The bold prints and colors of the handmade costumes come to their right as the dancers move to the music.

Aloha is the Hawaiian word for love, affection, peace, compassion and mercy that is commonly used as a simple greeting.

The hula dance was developed in the Hawaiian Islands by the Polynesians who originally settled there in ancient times before a written language existed. The hula dramatizes or portrays the stories told in the oli (chants without instruments) or mele (song with instruments often performed by a group) in a visual dance form. There are many sub-styles of hula, with the main two categories being Hula ʻAuana (modern) and Hula Kahiko (traditional). Hula is much more than just dance. It is the heartbeat of the Hawaiian people. The dance and chants played an important role in keeping history, genealogy, mythology and culture alive. With each movement – a hand gesture, step of foot, swaying of hips – a story unfolds. It is an expression of history, religion and the human spirit and through it; the Native Hawaiians were connected with their land and their gods.  And now you get to be connected to this history through a wonderful performance. 

The workshop following the dance will be held by the very inventive PAC teacher Donna Ross. Ms. Ross has a BFA from the School of Visual Arts and has taught children at Pelham Art Center for many years. She is a ceramicist, fine arts painter as well as a decorative, mural, and faux painter and restorer. In the workshop you will be making fun lei inspired necklaces. A lei is a garland or wreath. More loosely defined, a lei is any series of objects strung together with the intent to be worn. The most popular concept of lei in Hawaiian culture is a wreath of flowers presented upon arriving or leaving as a symbol of affection. 



Friday May 11,2018

WIECHQUAES KECK BY ANTHONY HEINZ MAY IN WOLFS LANE PARK
Friday May 11,2018
5:30-6:30 pm

 

Wiechquaes Keck by Anthony Heinz May
Opening Reception in Wolfs Lane Park
Friday May 11, 5:30-6:30 pm

Free and Open to All 

Pelham Art Center is announcing a new sculpture installation in Wolfs Lane Park by Anthony Heinz May.

Massive trees on the edge of rural Oregon valleys and farmlands where Anthony Heinz May grew up root his earliest memories. Much of his time was spent in contemplation of the natural world encompassing him.

Still fascinated by nature and its complexity, Heinz May combines his earliest visions and how humans relate to nature with his current home in NYC. The human constructed, squared world of concrete, steel and glass inform his geometric grid overlapping of nature.  The tree sculpture grows out of the ground like a natural tree and is broken into units reminiscent of pixels on screens that make up digital imagery.

The title Wiechquaes Keck honors the Native American tribe (Munsees) associated with the area of Pelham as originally called Wiechquaeskeck. The deed of the land conveyed to the Director General and Council of New Netherland identified it as "Wiequaes Keck". Heinz May fused the two names in the title of the work.

The artist does not cut down trees for his installations.  He finds materials in a variety of natural, rural and urban places including parks, forested areas and wherever trees have been uprooted, cut-down or displaced by human activity and storms (which from the perspective of Heinz May and his artistic practice, are arguably one and the same).

Heinz May uses chainsaws, band saws, hand pull saws, drills, chisels and angle grinders to carve the forms from the natural wood.

The sculptures of Heinz May have been exhibited in city environments and rural landscapes.  While in residency in Northern California at the Djerassi Artist Resident Program, Heinz May was given opportunity to work with a freestanding, dead Redwood in the thick of the woods there.  The piece called "Hemetca Sii" uses a Costanoan/Ohlone word-phrase that translates as "One Water."  Another more remote sculpture developed from driftwood found along the St. Lawrence River in Quebec during a cultural exchange residency program.  Installed on the small Quarry Island off the Côte-Nord region of Quebec, it's title is "Morte, Nature (Atsheneshu Atamatiku)", a rearrangement of the French words for "Still Life”: "Nature Morte", coupled with parenthetical Innu word-phrase meaning "infection in the heart of a tree". Visit www.anthonyheinzmay.com for more information about the artist.

 



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OPEN CALL: PUBLIC ART IN THE PARK
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The Pelham Art Center is seeking proposals for temporary public art, including solo and group exhibitions to be installed within the five-acre Village of Pelham’s newly redesigned Wolfs Lane Park. This exhibition will launch a newly created sculpture garden as well as introducing the entire park renovation to the public. We are looking for work that will be sited for three to six months, activates the park, while considering the scale, landscape and overall use of the public space. We strongly encourage site-specific proposals. Proposals will be selected by our Gallery Advisory Committee on the basis of creativity, interactivity, structural integrity and sustainability. The work will be installed across from the Metro North Railroad Pelham Station, at 1st Street and Wolf’s Lane in the Village of Pelham.

* Creativity/interactivity: Your work should be visually engaging and invite viewers of all ages to enter the park to experience the work further.

* Structural Integrity: Your work must be able to withstand three months of exposure to New York weather as well as unsupervised interaction from passers-by and visitors to Pelham day and night.

* Sustainability: Given the temporary nature of the installation, we encourage the submission of work created with found materials, or from materials that can be temporarily appropriated and then reused after the installation.

Please find the application HERE



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OPEN CALL: PUBLIC ART IN THE COURTYARD
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The Pelham Art Center is seeking proposals for temporary public solo and group exhibitions / installations to be installed in our 2,300sq.ft. open court yard. We are looking for work that can be sited for three months, activates the entire courtyard while considering the scale, architecture and use of the courtyard. We strongly encourage site-specific proposals. Proposals will be selected by our Gallery Advisory Committee on the basis of creativity, interactivity, structural integrity and sustainability.

 
* Creativity/interactivity: Your work should be visually engaging and invite viewers of all ages to enter the court yard to experience the work further.

 * Structural Integrity: Your work must be able to withstand three months of exposure to New York weather as well as unsupervised interaction from passers-by and visitors to the Art Center day and night.

 * Sustainability: Given the temporary nature of the installation, we encourage the submission of work created with found materials, or from materials that can be temporarily appropriated and then reused after the installation.

Please find the application HERE